Newsletters tagged "Customer inquiry"

Volume 15, #1, January 2017
The future of innovation belongs to those who can dream in their customers’ worlds
by Sheila Mello

You can check all the usual boxes—great execution, solid management, well-integrated teams, stellar new product development processes. Yet if you can’t see what’s coming in three, five, or ten years, you not only risk losing market share but also suffering the complete disintegration of your company, your industry, and your business model.

Volume 14, #8, December 2016
Arguments for and against using the customer as the unit of measure for defining new products
by Sheila Mello

It doesn’t matter what you call what the customer is doing. It only matters that you capture the emotional struggle surrounding that activity.

Volume 14, #7, November 2016
Understanding the zeitgeist of product development (and the electorate)
by Sheila Mello and Wayne Mackey

Conducting a survey before understanding the requirements—and without an image of what it is like to be the voter—gets the flawed results we saw in this year’s polls. Diving deeply into the populace enables far more accurate predictions.

Volume 14, #5, August 2016
Emotion as a key to creating change
by Sheila Mello

It’s no longer headline news that emotion plays a role in decision making, even in business. How can you take advantage of this fact to help people in your organization understand customers at a deep, intuitive level?

Volume 13, #7, December 2015
A party-goer's four-part guide to interviewing
by Sheila Mello

Even if you'd rather swallow hot pokers than engage in small talk, there are a few things you can learn from party conversation about interviewing customers effectively.

Volume 13, #4, August 2015
Watch what can happen when you give your market research organization a seat at the innovation table
by Sheila Mello

You probably have a good idea about what makes product development innovative. You may already have a plan to create a culture of innovation in your development organization. But are you overlooking a key part of the business that could contribute substantially to product development innovation?

Volume 12, #2, March 2014
Conduct better interviews when you learn to relax, tolerate silence, and be a little pushy
by Sheila Mello

One of the best ways to understand your customers’ lives is by interviewing them.

Unfortunately, the customer interview is one of the most frequently botched methods of obtaining information.

Find out why.

Volume 11, #4, August 2013
When it comes to understanding customers, brevity is overrated
by Sheila Mello

In the right hands, brevity can convey deep meaning—but those of us whose jobs involve getting to know customers need to go deep.

Volume 11, #3, May 2013
Why you need an attitude change about the what, who, and when of research
by Sheila Mello

Making new stuff is exciting. We talk about inspiration, creative sparks, and brainstorms; we celebrate debuts and unveilings. But while launch celebrations are common, nobody ever throws a research party. It’s easy to neglect the R part of R&D amidst all the attention to the D.

Volume 10, #6, November 2012
How a restless search for the next problem can help your company achieve and maintain greatness
by Wayne Mackey

Greatness is not about the size of the problems. Rather, it is the attitude that all problems need to be addressed. The culture of restlessness itself can become a powerful magnet to attract great talent.

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